Author Archive: Tom Sanzillo

Director of Finance Tom Sanzillo has 30 years of experience in public and private finance, including as a first deputy comptroller of New York State, where he held oversight over a $156 billion pension fund and $200 billion in municipal bond programs. 


What Happened When a Power Plant Closed in Upstate New York? Electricity Prices Stayed Low and Outside Coal-Fired Power Wasn’t Required

What Happened When a Power Plant Closed in Upstate New York? Electricity Prices Stayed Low and Outside Coal-Fired Power Wasn’t Required

The Grid Is Unaffected by the Retirement of Huntley Power Station


Our 2014 report on the failing financial health of the Huntley Generation Station in Tonawanda, N.Y., highlighted the fact that regional grid operators were relying less and less on the plant for electricity. Huntley’s capacity factor—the ratio of how much power it produced versus how much it was capable of producing—had been declining for five […]

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A Top Industry Advisor, Long Singing the Coal-Export Anthem, Follows a New Tune

A Top Industry Advisor, Long Singing the Coal-Export Anthem, Follows a New Tune

Firm Continues to Distance Itself From Its Previous Assessments

Wood Mackenzie in the lead-up to the collapse in the coal industry was the principal major business consultancy driving bullishness on the global coal trade. Granted, Wood Mackenzie is a firm with a great brand name—much of it deserved. Its coal-export analysis in recent years is not among the sagas that have earned it its strong reputation, […]

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Obstacles to Building Renewable Power in Kosovo Are Political, Not Technical

The Government of Kosovo, World Bank and Obama Administration Are Using Misleading Information to Attack Renewable Energy Potential; New Projects are Behind Schedule

Proponents of building a new coal-fired power plant in Kosovo have argued that the plant is needed because Kosovo has very limited ability to support a significant build out of wind and solar power resources. But a closer look at the situation shows that the obstacles to renewable energy development in Kosovo are more political […]

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The Federal Government’s Coal-Leasing Program Is Broken: Here’s How to Fix It

The Federal Government’s Coal-Leasing Program Is Broken: Here’s How to Fix It

Appoint a Price-Setting Commission; Ban Exports; Cancel Some Leases; Eliminate Self-Bonding; Mandate Set-Asides for Mine Clean-up and Miner Pensions; Require Twice-a-Year Audits; Assume Smaller Markets

It’s time for the U.S. to modernize how it manages its publicly owned coal reserves. That’s the essence of comments we’ve filed today with the Department of the Interior as it begins a review of its federal coal-leasing program in the Powder River Basin, a program that has been mismanaged for years at taxpayer expense […]

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Renewables Would Be a Far Cheaper Way to Power Kosovo Than What the World Bank Wants to Do

Renewables Would Be a Far Cheaper Way to Power Kosovo Than What the World Bank Wants to Do

Research Shows Little Justification for a New Coal-Fired Project

A preponderance of evidence supports our view that renewable energy would be cheaper and cleaner than the proposed coal-fired New Kosovo Power Plant. Research we’ve looked at (including by Lazard, Agora Energiewinde, and the International Renewable Energy Agency) covers energy markets in well over 20 nations and makes clear that the cost of electricity generated […]

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Audio: Our Comments on Pipeline-Overbuild Risks in Appalachia

Risks Associated With Natural Gas Infrastructure Expansion in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia

We’ve just posted this audio from our press conference earlier this week on our new study, “Risks Associated With Natural Gas Pipeline Expansion Across Appalachia.”  In addition to comments from IEEFA, the audio includes remarks by Joe Lovett, executive director of Appalachian Mountain Advocates. The report examines the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would traverse West Virginia […]

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The New Kosovo Power Plant: An Unnecessary Burden at an Unreasonable Cost (Update)

The New Kosovo Power Plant: An Unnecessary Burden at an Unreasonable Cost (Update)

World Bank’s Estimates for Electricity Demand Are Well Off the Mark; Renewable Commitments and Energy-Efficiency Plans Render Proposed Coal-Fired Plant Redundant

Today we’re revisiting a report we issued several weeks ago questioning the economic viability of a proposed new coal-fired electricity plant in Kosovo. The project stands to damage the economy of the country but the World Bank, the U.S. State Department, USAID and the Treasury Department support the “New Kosovo Power Plant,” or NKPP, nonetheless. […]

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IEEFA Data Bite: Coal Dependency in Kosovo Is More Extreme Than in the World’s Biggest Coal-Burning Countries

IEEFA Data Bite: Coal Dependency in Kosovo Is More Extreme Than in the World’s Biggest Coal-Burning Countries

The World Bank and the U.S. Government, by Supporting Expansion of a Status Quo Energy Model in the Balkans, Are Putting an Entire National Economy at Risk

Kosovo relied on coal for 97 percent of its electricity generation in 2013, according to the most recent data from the International Energy Agency, and its dependency hasn’t improved much (if at all) since then. Of the 12 biggest coal-burning countries in the world, none rely on it as intensely as Kosovo does. Only South […]

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Our Op-Ed in the New York Times: ‘After Bankruptcies, Coal’s Dirty Legacy Lives On
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Our Op-Ed in the New York Times: ‘After Bankruptcies, Coal’s Dirty Legacy Lives On
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Costly Effects That Will Haunt Taxpayers, and Consumers, for Years to Come 


The bankruptcy filing on Wednesday by Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private- sector producer of coal, is the latest in a series of major coal company collapses that threaten to leave behind a costly legacy that will haunt taxpayers and consumers for years. The abandonment of hundreds of mines over the years led Congress in […]

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Peabody’s Bankruptcy Will Shed Light Where Transparency Has Been Lacking


Peabody’s Bankruptcy Will Shed Light Where Transparency Has Been Lacking


A Review Is Long Due for How Coal Companies Report Information to Investors and Regulators


There will be much said today—and in the days to come—about Peabody Energy’s fall from grace. Here’s one takeaway: It’s good for the markets that the company has finally filed for bankruptcy because it lets investors get a more transparent look at what’s going on. The story has many wrinkles of note. Among them: First, the […]

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