Energy Policy

IEEFA Research

IEEFA Report: A Renewables Path to Japanese Energy Security in a Post-Nuclear Era

IEEFA Report: A Renewables Path to Japanese Energy Security in a Post-Nuclear Era

Eliminating High-Risk Dependence on Imported Fuels; Exploiting Domestic Technology Advantages; Avoiding Stranded Assets in Misguided Coal Projects

We’ve just published a report that details how Japan’s post-nuclear electricity-generation economy can be viably retooled around renewable energy. Our report—“Japan: Greater Energy Security Through Renewables: Electricity Transformation in a Post-Nuclear Economy”—emphasizes the potential for national energy security through renewables, most especially wind and solar. This report documents how government policies adopted in the wake […]

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IEEFA Report: A U.K. Electricity Transformation Under Way, But in Need of Better Direction

IEEFA Report: A U.K. Electricity Transformation Under Way, But in Need of Better Direction

Grid Proves Resilient in Face of 60% Drop in Coal Use in 2016; New Renewables and Interconnection Are the Future; Capacity Market Has Failed to Incentivize Modernization; More Targeted Auctions Would Help

The U.K.’s capacity market is the weak link in the country’s ongoing transition toward a resilient, low-carbon grid. That is one of the core findings in a  report—“Electricity-Grid Transition in the U.K.: As Coal-Fired Generation Recedes, Renewables and Reliable Generation Can Fill the Gap —we published today. The report finds that the U.K. grid is coping […]

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IEEFA Update: A Rush to Subsidies as Power Plants in Europe Face an Existential Threat

IEEFA Update: A Rush to Subsidies as Power Plants in Europe Face an Existential Threat

Paying Producers for Electricity They Might Never Generate

  So-called capacity markets are driving what appears to be a major new trend in energy policy across Europe: More public subsidies for electric utilities. Utilities may get—but not necessarily need or deserve—high-level government support for a variety of reasons, including for their role in equity markets, where they supply returns and dividends for pension […]

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More News and Commentary

Painful Transition in New Mexico

The Santa Fe New Mexican: For decades, three coal-fired power plants have formed an imposing presence on the landscape from Page, Ariz., to Farmington, N.M., providing electricity to hundreds of thousands of homes but releasing millions of tons of pollutants from their towering smokestacks. But one of the plants has been partially shut down, and […]

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IEEFA Report: A Renewables Path to Japanese Energy Security in a Post-Nuclear Era
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IEEFA Report: A Renewables Path to Japanese Energy Security in a Post-Nuclear Era

Eliminating High-Risk Dependence on Imported Fuels; Exploiting Domestic Technology Advantages; Avoiding Stranded Assets in Misguided Coal Projects

We’ve just published a report that details how Japan’s post-nuclear electricity-generation economy can be viably retooled around renewable energy. Our report—“Japan: Greater Energy Security Through Renewables: Electricity Transformation in a Post-Nuclear Economy”—emphasizes the potential for national energy security through renewables, most especially wind and solar. This report documents how government policies adopted in the wake […]

Read More →

IEEFA Report: A Viable, Low-Carbon Path Toward Energy Security for Japan’s Post-Fukushima Economy

Eliminating High-Risk Dependence on Imported Fuels; Vast Potential in Renewables and Buildout Around Domestic Technology Advantages; Stranded Assets in Coal Projects; Little Chance of Nuclear Industry Recovery

March 21, 2017 (IEEFA) — A report published today by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis details how Japan’s post-nuclear electricity-generation economy can be viably retooled around renewable energy. The report—“Japan: Greater Energy Security Through Renewables: Electricity Transformation in a Post-Nuclear Economy”—emphasizes the potential for national energy security through renewables, most especially wind […]

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GOP Congressional Group Breaks Ranks in Calling for Clean-Energy Economy

The Atlantic: In interviews, several Republican lawmakers who signed the resolution indicated they would consider supporting legislation to incentivize the use of clean energy. Seventeen Republican lawmakers, including Elise Stefanik of New York, Carlos Curbelo of Florida, Mark Sanford of South Carolina, Mia Love of Utah, Don Bacon of Nebraska, and Ryan Costello of Pennsylvania, […]

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IEEFA Exxon: White House’s Endorsement Is Just More Evidence of Distress

IEEFA Exxon: White House’s Endorsement Is Just More Evidence of Distress

Stock Hits 52-Week Low; Turnaround Plan Is Questionable; Buyers Beware

ExxonMobil’s deteriorating financial condition is on full view today after its stock opened at a 52-week low on news of lower oil prices. Investors, it’s safe to say, have met the company’s recent announcement of new capital investment with skepticism. ExxonMobil’s stock has now fallen by 15 percent just since this past December, a period in […]

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Norway’s Pension Fund Considers Divesting From Firms Facing Climate Risk

Reuters: The ethics watchdog for Norway’s $900-billion sovereign wealth fund will recommend this year that the fund exclude or put on a watch list several firms in the oil, cement and steel industries for emitting too much greenhouse gas. Carbon emissions are a new criteria for the fund, which was built up from the proceeds […]

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IEEFA Report: A U.K. Electricity Transformation Under Way, But in Need of Better Direction

IEEFA Report: A U.K. Electricity Transformation Under Way, But in Need of Better Direction

Grid Proves Resilient in Face of 60% Drop in Coal Use in 2016; New Renewables and Interconnection Are the Future; Capacity Market Has Failed to Incentivize Modernization; More Targeted Auctions Would Help

The U.K.’s capacity market is the weak link in the country’s ongoing transition toward a resilient, low-carbon grid. That is one of the core findings in a  report—“Electricity-Grid Transition in the U.K.: As Coal-Fired Generation Recedes, Renewables and Reliable Generation Can Fill the Gap —we published today. The report finds that the U.K. grid is coping […]

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IEEFA Report: As U.K. Sheds Coal by 2025, Renewables and Reliable Generation Can Fill the Gap

IEEFA Report: As U.K. Sheds Coal by 2025, Renewables and Reliable Generation Can Fill the Gap

Energy Transition Already Well Under Way; Policy Reforms Required to Address Failure of Current System to Incentivize Grid Modernization; Brexit Offers an Opportunity for Change

March 9, 2017 (IEEFA) — The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis published a report today that describes a path by which renewable energy can reliably and economically replace coal-fired generation in the U.K. The report—“Electricity-Grid Transition in the U.K.: As Coal-Fired Generation Recedes, Renewables and Reliable Generation Can Fill the Gap”—examines how recent […]

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IEEFA Update: Global Energy-Finance Transition Gains Steam

Electricity-Generation Technologies of the Past Century Are Growing Increasingly Unappealing to Investors

[Editor’s note: This column is taken from a speech last month to the Australian Senate on its inquiry into the retirement of coal-fired power stations] Good afternoon and thank you for allowing me the opportunity to speak on the critically important topic of Australian coal-fired power station retirements, particularly as it relates to energy system […]

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On the Blogs: U.S. Politics Unlikely to Slow Expansion of Wind and Solar

Axios.com: Trump has criticized wind-power, cast doubts on solar power’s cost effectiveness, and promised on the campaign trail he would bring back coal jobs. But Trump is unlikely to touch the tax credits that subsidize investments and production in solar and wind power. Here’s why that makes sense: States politically important to Trump support renewables […]

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