September 11, 2018 Read More →

Sioux tribe sues U.S. over Keystone XL approval

Casper Star-Tribune:

Native American tribes in Montana and South Dakota sued the Trump administration on Monday, claiming it approved an oil pipeline from Canada without considering potential damage to cultural sites from spills and construction.

Attorneys for the Rosebud Sioux tribe and Fort Belknap Indian Reservation asked U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Great Falls, Montana, to rescind the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, issued last year by the U.S. State Department.

The tribes argue President Donald Trump brushed aside their rights and put their members at risk when he reversed President Barack Obama’s rejection of the $8 billion TransCanada Corp. project.

The line would carry up to 830,000 barrels of crude daily along a 1,184-mile path from Canada to Nebraska. The route passes through the ancestral homelands of the Rosebud Sioux in central South Dakota and the Gros Ventre and Assiniboine Tribes in Montana.

The tribes said a spill from the line could damage a South Dakota water supply system that serves more than 51,000 people including on the Rosebud, Pine Ridge and Lower Brule Indian Reservations. An existing TransCanada pipeline, also called Keystone, suffered a spill last year that released almost 10,000 barrels of oil near Amherst, South Dakota.

In August, U.S. District Judge Brian Morris ordered the State Department to conduct a more thorough review of Keystone XL’s path through Nebraska. The move came in response to litigation from environmentalists and after state regulators changed the route.

More: Tribes: Trump illegally approved oil pipeline from Canada

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